We are happy to welcome Dr. Alexia Bodamer to our practice!
Tuesday, 20 February 2024 00:00

Congenital foot conditions often have unique signs, aiding in the diagnosis of underlying systemic issues. Conditions such as Ellis–van Creveld syndrome, fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, and Marfan syndrome show distinct foot abnormalities. For example, Ellis–van Creveld syndrome may feature extra toes, while fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva can cause deformities in the big toe. Similarly, conditions such as Kniest dysplasia may lead to short and deformed toes, and pseudo- and pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism can result in shortened metatarsal bones. Additionally, acromegaly can cause swelling and softness in the feet, while nail-patella syndrome may affect the toenails. Mucopolysaccharidoses often result in widened toe bones and thickened skin on the feet. If your child was born with a foot abnormality, it is strongly suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist as early as possible. 

Congenital foot problems require immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists of Parkwood Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Congenital foot problems are deformities affecting the feet, toes, and/or ankles that children are born with. Some of these conditions have a genetic cause while others just happen. Some specific foot ailments that children may be born with include clubfeet, polydactyly/macrodactyly, and cleft foot. There are several other foot anomalies that can occur congenitally. What all of these conditions have in common is that a child may experience difficulty walking or performing everyday activities, as well as trouble finding footwear that fits their foot deformity. Some of these conditions are more serious than others. Consulting with a podiatrist as early as possible will help in properly diagnosing a child’s foot condition while getting the necessary treatment underway.

What are Causes of Congenital Foot Problem?

A congenital foot problem is one that happens to a child at birth. These conditions can be caused by a genetic predisposition, developmental or positional abnormalities during gestation, or with no known cause.

What are Symptoms of Congenital Foot Problems?

Symptoms vary by the congenital condition. Symptoms may consist of the following:

  • Clubfoot, where tendons are shortened, bones are shaped differently, and the Achilles tendon is tight, causing the foot to point in and down. It is also possible for the soles of the feet to face each other.
  • Polydactyly, which usually consists of a nubbin or small lump of tissue without a bone, a toe that is partially formed but has no joints, or an extra toe.
  • Vertical talus, where the talus bone forms in the wrong position causing other bones in the foot to line up improperly, the front of the foot to point up, and the bottom of the foot to stiffen, with no arch, and to curve out.
  • Tarsal coalition, when there is an abnormal connection of two or more bones in the foot leading to severe, rigid flatfoot.
  • Cleft foot, where there are missing toes, a V-shaped cleft, and other anatomical differences.
  • Macrodactyly, when the toes are abnormally large due to overgrowth of the underlying bone or soft tissue.

Treatment and Prevention

While there is nothing one can do to prevent congenital foot problems, raising awareness and receiving neonatal screenings are important. Early detection by taking your child to a podiatrist leads to the best outcome possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Brunswick and Hinesville, GA . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Congenital Foot Problems
Friday, 16 February 2024 00:00

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Tuesday, 13 February 2024 00:00

Diabetic foot ulcers, a common complication of diabetes, require wound care management to prevent infection and promote healing. Begin by keeping the ulcer clean and dry, washing it gently with mild soap and water and patting it dry with a soft towel. Avoid using harsh chemicals or antiseptics, as they can further irritate the skin. Protect the ulcer with a sterile dressing to prevent contamination and promote a moist wound healing environment. Regularly monitor the ulcer for any signs of infection, such as increased redness, swelling, or drainage, and seek medical attention promptly if these symptoms occur. Offloading pressure from the ulcer is critical for healing, and consider using special footwear or orthotic devices to relieve pressure and prevent further damage. Follow your podiatrist’s recommendations for managing blood sugar levels, as elevated glucose levels can impair wound healing. If you have diabetes, and have developed a foot ulcer, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can treat this type of wound, in addition to helping you to manage your diabetes.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Parkwood Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Brunswick and Hinesville, GA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Tuesday, 06 February 2024 00:00

Cracked heels, a common foot ailment, can be traced back to various factors that contribute to their unsightly appearance and discomfort. Inadequate moisturization emerges as a primary culprit, as neglecting to keep the skin hydrated can lead to dryness and fissures. Prolonged standing or walking on hard surfaces exerts excessive pressure on the heels, causing them to crack. Wearing ill-fitting shoes exacerbates the issue, rubbing against the skin and creating friction that weakens the natural barrier. Additionally, exposure to harsh weather conditions, such as extreme heat or cold, can strip the skin of its moisture, making it prone to cracking. Poor foot hygiene and improper foot care practices may further contribute to the development of cracked heels. Cracked heels can be painful, and if you have developed this condition, it is suggested that you confer with a podiatrist who can prescribe medication for effective relief.

Cracked heels are unsightly and can cause further damage to your shoes and feet. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists from Parkwood Podiatry. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

Cracked heels appear unappealing and can make it harder for you walk around in sandals. Aside from looking unpleasant, cracked heels can also tear stockings, socks, and wear out your shoes. There are several methods to help restore a cracked heel and prevent further damage.

How Do You Get Them?

Dry skin is the number one culprit in creating cracked heels. Many athletes, walkers, joggers, and even swimmers suffer from cracked heels. Age and skin oil production play a role to getting cracked heels as well.

Promote Healing

Over the counter medicines can help, especially for those that need instant relief or who suffer from chronic dry feet.

Wear Socks – Wearing socks with medicated creams helps lock in moisture.

Moisturizers – Applying both day and night will help alleviate dryness which causes cracking.

Pumice Stones – These exfoliate and remove dead skin, which allows for smoother moisturizer application and better absorption into the skin. 

Change in Diet

Eating healthy with a well-balanced diet will give the skin a fresh and radiant look. Your body responds to the kinds of food you ingest. Omega-3 fatty acids and zinc supplements can also revitalize skin tissue.

Most importantly, seek professional help if unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels. A podiatrist will help you with any questions or information needed. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Brunswick and Hinesville, GA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Solutions for Cracked Heels

Connect With Us