We are happy to welcome Dr. Alexia Bodamer to our practice!
Tuesday, 23 April 2024 00:00

Preventing falls in elderly individuals is vital for maintaining health, independence, and quality of life. Falling can seriously impact the feet, which can cause difficulty in completing daily tasks. An important step is ensuring the home environment is safe and free from hazards such as loose rugs, cluttered pathways, and slippery floors. Installing handrails and grab bars in key areas like bathrooms and staircases can provide added support and stability. Encouraging regular physical activity, including balance and strength exercises, helps improve muscle tone and coordination, reducing the risk of falls. Ensuring proper footwear with nonskid soles and adequate support further enhances stability and reduces the likelihood of slips or trips. Regular vision and hearing check-ups are essential for maintaining sensory function and awareness of surroundings. Additionally, reviewing medications with healthcare providers to identify any potential side effects or interactions that may contribute to dizziness or instability can help mitigate fall risks. If you would like more information about how to keep your home safe to prevent falling in addition to protecting your feet, it is suggested that you confer with a podiatrist.

Preventing falls among the elderly is very important. If you are older and have fallen or fear that you are prone to falling, consult with one of our podiatrists from Parkwood Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality advice and care.

Every 11 seconds, an elderly American is being treated in an emergency room for a fall related injury. Falls are the leading cause of head and hip injuries for those 65 and older. Due to decreases in strength, balance, senses, and lack of awareness, elderly persons are very susceptible to falling. Thankfully, there are a number of things older persons can do to prevent falls.

How to Prevent Falls

Some effective methods that older persons can do to prevent falls include:

  • Enrolling in strength and balance exercise program to increase balance and strength
  • Periodically having your sight and hearing checked
  • Discuss any medications you have with a doctor to see if it increases the risk of falling
  • Clearing the house of falling hazards and installing devices like grab bars and railings
  • Utilizing a walker or cane
  • Wearing shoes that provide good support and cushioning
  • Talking to family members about falling and increasing awareness

Falling can be a traumatic and embarrassing experience for elderly persons; this can make them less willing to leave the house, and less willing to talk to someone about their fears of falling. Doing such things, however, will increase the likelihood of tripping or losing one’s balance. Knowing the causes of falling and how to prevent them is the best way to mitigate the risk of serious injury.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Brunswick and Hinesville, GA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 16 April 2024 00:00

Heel spurs, a common foot condition, refer to calcium deposits that develop on the underside of the heel bone. They often form in response to repetitive stress or strain on the foot's ligaments and muscles. While heel spurs themselves may not cause pain, they can contribute to discomfort and inflammation in the surrounding tissues, leading to conditions such as plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis. Heel spurs typically occur in the area where the plantar fascia, a thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot, attaches to the heel bone. As the body attempts to heal and repair the damaged tissues, calcium deposits may accumulate over time, resulting in the formation of a bony protrusion. Understanding the location and nature of heel spurs is essential for effective treatment and management strategies. If you have heel pain, it is strongly suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can accurately diagnose heel spurs and offer you appropriate treatment methods. 

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact one of our podiatrists from Parkwood Podiatry. Our doctors will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main condition's spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact our offices located in Brunswick and Hinesville, GA . We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

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Tuesday, 09 April 2024 00:00

Rheumatoid arthritis, abbreviated RA, is a chronic autoimmune disorder that primarily targets the joints, often causing inflammation, pain, and stiffness. When it comes to the feet, RA can manifest in various ways, affecting both the joints and surrounding tissues. A common symptom is morning stiffness, where the feet feel tender and stiff upon waking or after periods of inactivity. Swelling, redness, and warmth around the joints, particularly in the toes and ankles, are common indicators of inflammation associated with RA. As the disease progresses, deformities such as bunions or hammertoes may develop, altering the alignment and structure of the feet. Additionally, RA can lead to persistent pain and discomfort during movement, impacting mobility and overall function. If you are experiencing symptoms of RA in your feet, it is suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can help you manage this condition.

Because RA affects more than just your joints, including the joints in your feet and ankles, it is important to seek early diagnosis from your podiatrist if you feel like the pain in your feet might be caused by RA. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists of Parkwood Podiatry. Our doctors will assist you with all of your podiatric concerns.

What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks the membranes surrounding the joints. Inflammation of the lining and eventually the destruction of the joint’s cartilage and bone occur, causing severe pain and immobility.

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Feet

Although RA usually attacks multiple bones and joints throughout the entire body, almost 90 percent of cases result in pain in the foot or ankle area.

Symptoms

  • Swelling and pain in the feet
  • Stiffness in the feet
  • Pain on the ball or sole of feet
  • Joint shift and deformation

Diagnosis

Quick diagnosis of RA in the feet is important so that the podiatrist can treat the area effectively. Your doctor will ask you about your medical history, occupation, and lifestyle to determine the origin of the condition. Rheumatoid Factor tests help to determine if someone is affected by the disease.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Brunswick and Hinesville, GA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 02 April 2024 00:00

Caring for a diabetic foot wound demands meticulous attention and specialized techniques to promote healing and prevent complications. Begin by gently cleansing the wound with mild soap and lukewarm water, ensuring thorough yet gentle removal of any debris or bacteria. Pat the area dry with a clean towel, taking care not to rub or irritate the skin. Apply a prescribed antibiotic ointment or cream to safeguard against infection, and cover the wound with a sterile dressing or bandage to maintain cleanliness and moisture balance. Monitor the wound closely for any signs of infection, such as increased redness, swelling, warmth, or drainage, and promptly seek medical attention from a podiatrist if such symptoms arise. Refrain from applying adhesive bandages directly to the wound, as they may cause further trauma or hinder healing. It is important to prioritize weight-bearing off the affected foot to alleviate pressure and promote optimal recovery. If you have diabetes, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can properly treat diabetic foot wounds.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Parkwood Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Brunswick and Hinesville, GA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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